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Afghanistan in need of animal feed

A new drought response plan will help 1.4 million of the most vulnerable drought-affected people in Afghanistan with seeds, fertilisers and animal feed.

The drought plan will help millions of people in Afghanistan during the coming winter season and into April next year, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) announced on the sidelines of the Geneva Conference on Afghanistan (27-28 November).

A new drought response plan will help 1.4 million of the most vulnerable drought-affected people in Afghanistan with seeds, fertilisers and animal feed. Photo: Wikimedia
A new drought response plan will help 1.4 million of the most vulnerable drought-affected people in Afghanistan with seeds, fertilisers and animal feed. Photo: Wikimedia

Wheat seeds, fertilisers and animal feed

FAO is working with partner organisations to provide vulnerable farmers in 22 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces – particularly households headed by women or people with disabilities – with urgently-needed wheat seeds and fertilisers in time for the winter planting season when much-needed rains are forecast to finally arrive. Livestock protection measures, including concentrated livestock feed, fodder crop seed, and animal health services are also being provided. Livestock is a key source of food and livelihoods for the majority of rural Afghans; keeping livestock healthy through the harsh winter is therefore essential for rural food security, preserves breeding stocks and sustains rural livelihoods for the coming years.

Donors needed

FAO’s drought response plan is also intended to help people stay at their places of origin and reduce drought-induced displacements. FAO requires $ 30 million to carry out this emergency response. Many donors including the Afghanistan Humanitarian Fund, Belgium, France, Japan, Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), have already generously responded. FAO hopes many more will do so in the coming weeks.

Source: FAO