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New edition of All About Feed now online

In the 6th edition of All About Feed we look at in-feed resin acids to promote growth and feed intake in livestock. We seek solutions for health rather than treatments for diseases, and consider the importance of bringing science back to pet food.

New kid on the block: In-feed resin acids

In Finnish folk medicine, rosin, which is found in the northern coniferous forests, is known for its anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties. Finnish company Hankkija Oy investigated the potential of resin acids, the active compounds of rosin, for animal feed and so developed a resin acids product by refining the natural resin acid molecules from the side stream of the paper industry. Research has shown these resin acids to be a powerful, natural tool to reduce antibiotic use and to promote growth and feed intake in livestock.

The full article can be read on page 18 of this edition of All About Feed.

Resin-based products have been explored as feed components to improve and maintain intestinal health of broilers. Photo: Shutterstock
Resin-based products have been explored as feed components to improve and maintain intestinal health of broilers. Photo: Shutterstock

Nutrition is key in reducing antibiotics

Veterinary consultant Anna Catharina Berge discusses how nutrition is key to a healthy, non-antibiotic production system. She explains how we need to seek solutions for health rather than treatments for diseases.
Good nutrition starts with optimal nutrients for the age and production stage of the animal. A healthy start must consider that young animals have been designed to obtain a good level of immune protection through colostrum and milk. By increasing the weaning age of the piglets, producers are reaping the benefits of stronger pigs.
Dr Berge also highlights the importance of partnering nutrition with vaccinations, which is strongly dependent on the animal’s ability to mount a good immune response, and thereby nutritional status and immunity are of greatest importance.
Read more about nutrition in promoting a non-antibiotic production system on page 22 of this edition.

The key to a healthy animal is a healthy gut, and therefore nutrition is key to a healthy, non-antibiotic production system.  Photo: Fotostudio Atelier 68
The key to a healthy animal is a healthy gut, and therefore nutrition is key to a healthy, non-antibiotic production system. Photo: Fotostudio Atelier 68

Bringing back the science in pet food

Dr Melissa Brookshire is founder of North River Enterprises, a company in the US serving the pet food industry with veterinary customer support and regulatory compliance advice. She spoke at the pet food session at ONE: The Alltech Ideas Conference, in Kentucky. With almost 70% of US households owning a pet, Dr Brookshire focused on the humanisation of pets and the effect this has on pet nutrition. She believes that this humanisation of pets trend is a threat and that misinformation is replacing the facts and the science, which is dangerous.
“We need to bring back the science to the conversation. We need to re-focus on what is truly best for pets when it comes to nutrition and the feed ingredients used,” says Brookshire.

Read the full article on page 25.

In the US, households with pets outnumbered households with kids by some 30 million. Photo: Dreamstime
In the US, households with pets outnumbered households with kids by some 30 million. Photo: Dreamstime

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