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3rd edition of All About Feed 2020 now online

In the 3rd edition of All About Feed for 2020 we zoom in on a bespoke feed management system in Ireland. We consider broccoli for broilers, herbal extracts to combat Newcastle Disease, and clover grass for pigs. As we look ahead at the challenges facing the agricultural sector, the science of genome editing is discussed with Senior Science Advisor for agricultural biotechnologies at FAS. We also consider yeast as a microbial for calves and give an update on liquid pig feed supplementation.

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Feed tech keeps an eye on cows

Irish agtech firm Cainthus has launched a new feed management system that uses a smart camera to observe, digitise and convert data into information, keeping the farmer informed in real time, 24/7. We chatted to CEO Aidan Connolly to learn more about this bespoke technology.

“The ability to watch cows continuously has never been possible, but for the first time in history we now have that ability,” said Cainthus CEO Aidan Connolly. Photo: Ron Ludekens
“The ability to watch cows continuously has never been possible, but for the first time in history we now have that ability,” said Cainthus CEO Aidan Connolly. Photo: Ron Ludekens

Pigs thrive on clover grass protein

In terms of pig welfare and growth, as well as meat quality and taste, feeding experiments with organic pigs at Aarhus University in Denmark set out to determine the effect of replacing traditional protein – typically soya – with protein extracted from locally produced clover grass.

Pig feed formulations for antibiotic-free production

Feed is a critical aspect of successful raised-without-antibiotics production. In North America the challenges remain regarding antibiotic-free production, whereas in Canada, easing regulations allow the use of some ingredients already available internationally.

Grand Valley Fortifiers’ monogastric nutritionist Bruce Schumann believes that raised-without-antibiotics production should get easier as the number of vaccines continues to grow. Photo: President’s Choice
Grand Valley Fortifiers’ monogastric nutritionist Bruce Schumann believes that raised-without-antibiotics production should get easier as the number of vaccines continues to grow. Photo: President’s Choice

Broccoli extract or essential oils in broilers

Essential oils have been shown to possess antioxidant properties. Similar properties have been identified in broccoli waste. In this article we look at the value of this green vegetable waste and determine if it can be equated to that of essential oils.

Genome editing reshapes agriculture

All About Feed speaks to Diane Wray-Cahen, senior science advisor for agricultural biotechnologies at the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). We discuss genome editing as a part of the solution to tackling climate change, animal diseases and more demanding consumers within the agricultural space.

“[Genome editing], in my opinion, it is the most promising and innovative technology for agricultural breeding that I have seen in the last 30 years,” says Diane Wray-Cahen, Senior Science Advisor for agricultural biotechnologies at the FAS. Photo: USDA
“[Genome editing], in my opinion, it is the most promising and innovative technology for agricultural breeding that I have seen in the last 30 years,” says Diane Wray-Cahen, Senior Science Advisor for agricultural biotechnologies at the FAS. Photo: USDA

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Yeast as a direct-fed microbial for neonatal calves

The greatest proportion of morbidity and mortality in dairy production occurs among pre-weaned calves. There is a need to find alternative feed additives that can improve calf growth and health by modifying the resident GI microflora. Direct-fed microbials, or probiotics, may meet this need.

Yeasts can withstand the conditions of the digestive tract and are resistant to antibiotics. Photo: Ton Kastermans Fotografie
Yeasts can withstand the conditions of the digestive tract and are resistant to antibiotics. Photo: Ton Kastermans Fotografie

The effects of herbal extracts on combating Newcastle Disease

Herbal medicines are being used as immunomodulators to fight Newcastle Disease in poultry. In this article we look at a study that set out to determine if echinacea, liquorice and propolis are potential alternatives for conventional therapies.

The effects of a natural herbal medicine on the immune response in chickens was evaluated. Photo: Pentalux
The effects of a natural herbal medicine on the immune response in chickens was evaluated. Photo: Pentalux

Supplementation for liquid pig feed

Liquid feeding provides some benefits over dry feed in pig production, including the capacity for producers to make quick diet adjustments, and to more easily mix in new supplements. New products focus on gut and immune heath.

“The high price of dry feed, as well as the improved performance and health and well-being of the animals with liquid feed, have driven the increased use of liquid feed in North America,” said Jan Bebber, from Ohly. Photo: Biomin
“The high price of dry feed, as well as the improved performance and health and well-being of the animals with liquid feed, have driven the increased use of liquid feed in North America,” said Jan Bebber, from Ohly. Photo: Biomin

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