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Introducing the 4th 2020 edition of All About Feed

In the 4th 2020 edition of All About Feed, we look at how regulations are a challenge in ramping up the production of insects for animal feed, and how systemic issues persist in the importation of feed to Russia. We look at the addition of bile acids to fight ketosis in dairy cows and consider a different approach to detecting mycotoxins. Could sugarcane by-products be the future of feed, and why has canola meal become so popular?

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Insects in feed: challenge to upscale

Growing and using insects for feed is a sector that has seen significant growth in recent years. Insects offer a good alternative source of protein and can contribute to a more sustainable food chain. The sector is ready to scale up production, but legalities seem to be the biggest challenge.

“Using insects as animal feed has additional benefits… in terms of animal health. Research is being carried out into whether insects can be helpful for reducing the use of antibiotics,” says Arnold van Huis, Emeritus Professor, Tropical Entomologist, Wageningen University Photo: Insect World
“Using insects as animal feed has additional benefits… in terms of animal health. Research is being carried out into whether insects can be helpful for reducing the use of antibiotics,” says Arnold van Huis, Emeritus Professor, Tropical Entomologist, Wageningen University Photo: Insect World

Russian feed additive industry struggles with regulatory barriers

Russia is one of the world’s largest feed additives importers. Over the past decade, nearly 10,000 applications have been submitted to the Russian veterinary watchdog to register imported feed additives but only 3,000 have been approved. Systemic problems persist.

Russia imports a wide range of feed additives worth some US$900 million annually. Photo: The National Feed Union
Russia imports a wide range of feed additives worth some US$900 million annually. Photo: The National Feed Union

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Bile acids in feed to relieve fatty liver and ketosis in dairy cows

High-yielding cows are prone to fatty liver and ketosis, which are nutritional metabolic diseases.

The addition of bile acids to feed can prevent and treat fatty liver, reduce the incidence of ketosis and increase milk production.

Bile acids strengthen liver health and Increase milk production. Photo: Koos Groenewold
Bile acids strengthen liver health and Increase milk production. Photo: Koos Groenewold

Detecting mycotoxin lesions in slaughterhouses

It is standard practice to sample feed ingredients to test for mycotoxin contamination in the feed, but Agrimprove is taking a different approach and looks at mycotoxin lesions in slaughterhouses.

Kevin Vanneste, Agrimprove product manager: “Specialists look for specific lesions related to mycotoxins macroscopically.”
Kevin Vanneste, Agrimprove product manager: “Specialists look for specific lesions related to mycotoxins macroscopically.”

Sugarcane by-products: The future feed

Bagasse and cane trash, which are 2 by-products from the sugarcane industry, have been examined by researchers at Queensland University of Technology to transform them

into quality feed ingredients.

Canola meal has been proven to deliver higher milk production, better quality milk and less impact on the environment in the dairy sector. Photo: Canola Council of Canada
Canola meal has been proven to deliver higher milk production, better quality milk and less impact on the environment in the dairy sector. Photo: Canola Council of Canada

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Raising the phytase podium

Phytases have been increasingly used in animal feeds, and while effective phytases are currently available on the market, there is still room for improvement.

A new phytase enzyme can completely replace all inorganic phosphorus supplementation in piglet diets. Photo: Van Assendelft Fotografie
A new phytase enzyme can completely replace all inorganic phosphorus supplementation in piglet diets. Photo: Van Assendelft Fotografie

Canola meal in dairy rations

Countries around the world have started to make use of high-protein canola meal in feed. New research now explains why this feed ingredient has become popular.

Rapeseed oil was shown to reduce methane production by 7.3% in cattle. Photo: Shutterstock
Rapeseed oil was shown to reduce methane production by 7.3% in cattle. Photo: Shutterstock

Mitigating methane production in the rumen

A 20% reduction in methane emissions could allow growing cattle to gain an additional 75 g/d of weight. There are several feeding strategies that can be adopted to reduce methane production in the rumen. In this article we focus is on the use of fat supplements.

The addition of xylo-oligomers to animal diets has been explored. Benefits include better gut integrity, and modulation of the immune response. Photo: Ruud Hissink
The addition of xylo-oligomers to animal diets has been explored. Benefits include better gut integrity, and modulation of the immune response. Photo: Ruud Hissink

Supplementing pig diets with xylo-oligomers and xylanase

Many US swine producers use xylanase for its positive effect on liveability and feed efficiency. But, how does xylanase achieve this?

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