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Introducing the 7th 2020 edition of All About Feed

In the 7th 2020 edition of All About Feed, we consider seaweed and eucalyptus in reducing methane in cows. We travel to Russia to see how the country may overcome a shortage of protein on its domestic feed market, and ask if housefly larvae are a viable protein source in sustainable layer nutrition. We dig deeper into feed additives and determine how these additives can mitigate the effect of pig disease viruses in contaminated feed, and we visit a factory where 20,000 t of organic residues can be processed into 2,000 t of a C2-C8 fatty acid mixture.

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Supplementing seaweed to reduce methane production

By developing a seaweed-based feed supplement, Volta Greentech is on a mission to make cows belch less methane. All About Feed editor, Marieke Ploegmakers, speaks to co-founders Leo Wezelius and Angelo Demeter to discuss how they plan to produce enough algae at a low cost, and develop a business model which creates incentives for farmers to use this solution.

Swedish start-up Volta Greentech co-founders Leo Wezelius (CMO) and Angelo Demeter (head of R&D). Photos: Volta Greentech
Swedish start-up Volta Greentech co-founders Leo Wezelius (CMO) and Angelo Demeter (head of R&D). Photos: Volta Greentech

Eucalyptus reduces methane in dairy calves

In a search for sustainable and environmentally friendly strategies to mitigate methane production, researchers have discovered that Eucalyptus leaf extract may be valuable in reducing methane production in dairy calves.

Russian company Metanica has recently presented a new generation of inactivated protein biomass based on methane under the brand name Metaprin. Photo: Unibio
Russian company Metanica has recently presented a new generation of inactivated protein biomass based on methane under the brand name Metaprin. Photo: Unibio

Bioprotein production is perking up in Russia

Russia may overcome a shortage of protein on its domestic feed market thanks to several independent projects working on bioprotein production, which could give bioprotein production in Russia a second chance.

There is much potential for insects in poultry feed as the production of insects demands limited amounts of water and land and they can add value to low-value by-products. Photo: Koos Groenewold
There is much potential for insects in poultry feed as the production of insects demands limited amounts of water and land and they can add value to low-value by-products. Photo: Koos Groenewold

Housefly larvae contribute to sustainable layer nutrition

Are housefly larvae a viable protein source in sustainable layer nutrition, and could it fully replace soya at a competitive price? In this article, we dig into the details.

Denmark’s annual imports of soy corresponds to 711,000 t of pure soy protein and takes up an area of 760,000 ha. Photo: Shutterstock
Denmark’s annual imports of soy corresponds to 711,000 t of pure soy protein and takes up an area of 760,000 ha. Photo: Shutterstock

Denmark’s transition from soy to grass

Denmark imports 1.5 to 1.7 million t of soy annually, but grass protein can replace imported soy protein in compound feed for livestock. Researchers in Denmark have now determined how much of the current agricultural land in the country should be used for grass production to replace soy.

The cows’ annual ration is 25% fresh grass, 50% silage grass and the other 25% consists of concentrates. Photo: Jan Willem Van Vliet
The cows’ annual ration is 25% fresh grass, 50% silage grass and the other 25% consists of concentrates. Photo: Jan Willem Van Vliet

Ongoing challenge to use grass optimally

Dutch dairy farmers Wout Huijzer and Nely Schutte look after 125 dairy and calf cows and 40 youngstock on their 60 hectares of 100% grassland. Maintaining a tight pasturing schedule, they milk an average of 8,500 kg of milk per cow with 4.48% milk fat 3.61% protein.

It all started at Wageningen UR, at the university laboratory, where a fermentation technology was invented. Today, in the current factory, 20,000 t of organic residues can be processed into 2,000 t of a C2-C8 fatty acid mixture. Photos: ChainCraft
It all started at Wageningen UR, at the university laboratory, where a fermentation technology was invented. Today, in the current factory, 20,000 t of organic residues can be processed into 2,000 t of a C2-C8 fatty acid mixture. Photos: ChainCraft

Gilts are more sensitive to Beauvericin than sows

In this edition’s column, mycotoxins researcher, Dr Regiane Santos, discusses a Fusarium mycotoxin, Beauvericin, which is known for its antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties, but it also causes oxidative stress and cell death.

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Converting organic residues into fatty acids

A fermentation technology to produce fatty acids from fruit and vegetable residues has been developed by Amsterdam-based company ChainCraft. It produces mainly caproic acid (C6), which is known for its animal health-promoting properties. After a decade of developing this bio-based innovation, the company has scaled up and is now ready to serve the animal feed market.

Numerous scientific publications have demonstrated the ability of plant extracts to strengthen animal performance. Photo: Pancosma
Numerous scientific publications have demonstrated the ability of plant extracts to strengthen animal performance. Photo: Pancosma

Argentina: Wheat harvest up, maize harvest down

Argentina’s wheat production for marketing year 2020/21 is forecast at 20 million t due to positive prices and strong interest from farmers. Meanwhile, the country’s maize production is forecast at 47.6 million t of which exports will account for 33 million t with Vietnam being the main destination.

Promoting growth and feed efficiency with bioactives

Plant extracts appear to be of interest in the search for finding alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. They have antimicrobial properties and can trigger specific receptors that induce host responses.

Legume bloat, nitrate poisoning, acidosis mastitis, and parasites are some of the more common illnesses and conditions in cattle. Photo: Hans Banus
Legume bloat, nitrate poisoning, acidosis mastitis, and parasites are some of the more common illnesses and conditions in cattle. Photo: Hans Banus

Ruminant feeding under disease and parasite-related conditions

What are the most common disease problems in cattle, and what feeding strategies can be adopted to reduce the impact of sickness on animal production and profitability?

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Feed additives mitigate the effect of pig disease viruses in feed

Results from a study show the effect of different commercial additives on mitigating the transmission of 3 serious viral pig diseases – Senecavirus A (SVA), Porcine Epidemic a virus (PEDv) and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) – through contaminated feed.

Fast but accurate

In this edition’s column, feed mill and machinery expert, Wayne Cooper, looks at the similarity between a skilled driver behind the wheel of an SUV in a Russian city, and a feed microsystem, and how both can be “fast but accurate”.

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